Subtitle

 
 So Proudly We Hail
 
 
Flag / National Anthem / Pledge of Allegiance Protocol
Section 9 of title 4, United States Code, is amended by striking `all persons present' and all that follows through the end of the section and inserting the following: `all persons present in uniform should render the military salute. Members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute. All other persons present should face the flag and stand at attention with their right hand over the heart, or if applicable, remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Citizens of other countries present should stand at attention. All such conduct toward the flag in a moving column should be rendered at the moment the flag passes.  If you are driving, or riding a motorcycle in uniform, on a base and the National Anthem plays, stop the car get out, come to attention and salute.  If your a civilian stop the car or motorcycle and sit at attention.
 
 U.S. Code § 4 - Pledge of allegiance to the flag; manner of delivery

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag: ?I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.?, should be rendered by standing at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. When not in uniform men should remove any non-religious headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Persons in uniform should remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute. Members of the Armed Forces not in uniform and veterans may render the military salute in the manner provided for persons in uniform.

 


   Where do you put the flag on a vehicle or Motorcycle?
 
 Although not specific on Motorcycles, we can assume from the following language that a motorcycle is also a "motorcar".   
 
 (b) The flag should not be draped over the hood, top, sides, or back of a vehicle or of a railroad train or a boat. When the flag is displayed on a motorcar, the staff shall be fixed firmly to the chassis or clamped to the Right Side of the vehicle.right 

 
What is the law in California that covers "Flashers", "Emergency Lights", "Strobes"


For Emergency Lights go here

 

 
 
 Do You Put Brass "casings" Into the Flag?
UNITED STATES CODE TITLE 4 CHAPTER 1
(THE FLAG) SEC.8 (RESPECT FOR THE FLAG) PAR.H
 
READS :
 
"THE FLAG SHOULD NEVER BE USED AS A RECEPTACLE FOR RECEIVING, HOLDING, CARRYING, OR DELIVERING ANYTHING."
 
SPENT CASING SHOULD BE GIVEN TO THE FAMILY AFTER THE FLAG. or kept by the Honor Guard to return to the Post or Base.  Of Note:  Some services are still placing the casings into the flag, such as the Marine Corp

Does the three volleys constitute a 21 Gun Salute?
 
No.  It constitutes a 21 "rifle" salute.   "Guns" (Canons) are larger weapons of war.
 

When do you salute, 
during the Rifle Shots or During Taps?
 
For US Navy the requirements can be found in the US Navy Regulations chapter 12, paragraph 1289, sub-paragraph 6 which reads as follows:

Persons in the naval (& Marine) service shall salute
when the body has been carried past them, while
the body is being lowered into the grave or
committed to the deep, and during the firing of
volleys and the sounding of ?Taps?.
 
For USAF, Regulation 134-1201 8.1.7 states:
When at a military funeral in uniform,
salute the caisson or hearse as it passes and the casket
as it is carried by your position.
You should also salute during the firing of volleys and the playing of Taps.
 "All vehicles in motion should come to a stop at the first note
of the music and the occupants should sit quietly until the music ends."
 
For the US Army Regulation 600-25 States:
 In the ARMY:  At the first note of music or first round (firing) of salute,
face the ceremonial party and render hand salute.
End salute on last note of music or when last round of salute
has been fired. 
Each time casket is moved: Outdoors:
Render hand salute.
Indoors: Stand at attention
 
Note:  Nowhere does it describe the "salute" as a mandatory action for Civilians
or Veterans.   However you can assume by the current Presidential Order (Section 9 of title 4, United States Code), that any Veteran "may" render a salute, and that probably means that the protocol for that Departed Veterans branch of service should be followed.  Civilians should place their hands over their hearts and civilian men remove their hats and place them over their hearts.
 

 What does "dipping" the flag mean?
 
 
 

In this video, 'dipping' refers to the? 'action' of the flag pole being lowered when it's held by a person.

If you check out Britain's Union Jack flag in ceremonies, the Union Jack will do a one-time, salute-like 'dip' when her Royal Majesty the Queen first makes her appearance in the scene.

 
 "§176. Respect for flag
No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any person or thing. Regimental colors, State flags, and organization or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor."   To dip a flag means to lower then raise the flag at an angle in one motion in order to show respect to someone, some place, or some thing.  
 e United States Of America Flag is NEVER dipped!  To display the flag at an angle from a building for instance is NOT what dipping means.

 

Standards of Use:

  • The flag should never be dipped to any person or thing, unless it is the ensign responding to a salute from a ship of a foreign nation. This is sometimes misreported as a tradition that comes from the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, where countries were asked to dip their flag to King Edward VII; American team flag bearer Ralph Rose did not follow this protocol, and teammate Martin Sheridan is often, though apocryphally, quoted as proclaiming that "this flag dips before no earthly king." This tradition was codified as early as the 1911 U.S. Army drill regulations.
  • The flag should never be displayed with the union (the starred blue union in the Canton) down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.
  • The flag should not be used as "wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery", or for covering a speaker's desk, draping a platform, or for any decoration in general (exception for coffins). Bunting of blue, white and red stripes is available for these purposes. The blue stripe of the bunting should be on the top.
  • The flag should never be drawn back or bunched up in any way.
  • The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling.
  • The flag should never be used for any advertising purpose. It should not be embroidered, printed, or otherwise impressed on such articles as cushions, handkerchiefs, napkins, boxes, or anything intended to be discarded after temporary use. Advertising signs should not be attached to the staff or halyard.
  • The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used, or stored in such a manner as to permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or damaged in any way.
  • The flag should not be used as part of a costume or athletic uniform, except that a flag patch may be used on the uniform of military personnel, firefighters, police officers, and members of patriotic organizations.
  • Flag lapel pins may also be worn (they are considered replicas) and are worn near the heart.
  • The flag should never have any mark, insignia, letter, word, number, figure, or drawing of any kind placed on it or attached to it.
  • The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything.
  • The flag should never be stepped on.
  • In a parade, the flag should not be draped over the hood, top, sides, or back of a vehicle, railroad train, or boat. When the flag is displayed on a motorcar, the staff shall be fixed firmly to the chassis or clamped to the right fender.
  • When the flag is lowered, no part of it should touch the ground or any other object; it should be received by waiting hands and arms. To store the flag it should be folded neatly and ceremoniously.
  • The flag should be cleaned and mended when necessary.
  • If the flag is being used at a public or private estate, it should not be hung (unless at half staff or when an all-weather flag is displayed) during rain or violent weather.
  • When a flag is so tattered that it no longer fits to serve as a symbol of the United States, it should be destroyed in a dignified manner, preferably by burning. The American Legion, Boy Scouts of America, Girl Scouts of the USA,[9][10] National Sojourners, and other organizations regularly conduct dignified flag-burning ceremonies, often on Flag Day, June 14.
  • The flag should never touch anything beneath it. Contrary to an urban legend, the flag code does not state that a flag that touches the ground should be burned. Instead, it is considered disrespectful to the flag and the flag in question should be moved in such a manner so it is not touching the ground.
  • The flag should always be permitted to fall freely. (An exception was made during the Apollo moon landings when the flag hung from an extensible horizontal bar, allowing full display even in the absence of an atmosphere.)

A shock to most people would be the fact that the US Code doesn't describe how to fold a flag rather merely states:  "folded".  

If it did, manufacturers would not be able to fold a flag in any position other then what was described.

So, the Code merely states "folded".   Nothing in US Law requires a Triangle fold.  However, the various military services do require it.

ADDITIONALLY, nothing in US Code requires the American flag be in front of or on top of other flags when placed on a table or stacked.   Seems common sense, but its NOT a part of the code.

Can the Flag be displayed at an angle?

 United States Code, Title 36 Chapter 10, Section H

 "(h) When the flag of the United States is displayed from a staff projecting horizontally or at an angle from the window sill, balcony, or front of a building, the union of the flag should be placed at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half staff. When the flag is suspended over a sidewalk from a rope extending from a house to a pole at the edge of the sidewalk, the flag should be hoisted out, union first, from the building."

 

Military Funerals

There will be that rare occasion when the Ride Captain or the Riders will be asked to do "Honors" at a funeral for a Veteran.   This explains the procedures.

 

Approach the casket in an orderly manner after the first row of funeral guests passes. The first row of funeral guests is generally comprised of the next-of-kin and other family and friends. Wait until all civilians have passed the casket before taking your place in the file. Use marching techniques and facing movements to approach the casket. If you are marching concurrently with another, march in step; the Honor Guard Captain must whisper cadence as you approach the casket.

Halt three steps in front of the casket and stand at the position of attention. If you are with another soldier, the highest ranking soldier between you must whisper the command, "Present arms."

Slowly raise your right hand into a salute. Unlike normal salutes, a funeral salute must be executed slowly and respectfully. Hold the salute for approximately three seconds or until the higher-ranking soldier issues the command, "Order arms." This command must also be issued in hushed tones. Slowly lower your hand and resume the position of attention.

For the full description of what and how to Captain a Memorial Service, go here:

http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/images/hgguide.pdf 

 

Saluting During Ramp Ceremonies

 

Stand in formation while you await the arrival of the fallen soldier's casket. If you are leading the formation, call your troops to attention when the casket comes into view. If you are a member of the formation, you will be ordered to the position of attention at the appropriate time.

Issue the command "Present arms" when the casket is five paces away from the end of your formation if you are leading the formation. If you are a member of the formation, raise your right hand in a normal salute when issued the command "Present arms."

Issue the command "Order arms" when the casket is placed inside the military aircraft for departure. If you are a member of the formation, hold the salute until you are ordered to drop it.

Executive Order 10834, referred to in text, is set out as a note under section 1 of this title.
Freedom To Display the American Flag

Pub. L. 109?243, July 24, 2006, 120 Stat. 572, provided that: ?SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
?This Act may be cited as the ?Freedom to Display the American Flag Act of 2005?.
?SEC. 2. DEFINITIONS.
?For purposes of this Act?
?(1) the term ?flag of the United States? has the meaning given the term ?flag, standard, colors, or ensign? under section 3 of title 4, United States Code;
?(2) the terms ?condominium association? and ?cooperative association? have the meanings given such terms under section 604 ofPublic Law 96?399 (15 U.S.C. 3603);
?(3) the term ?residential real estate management association? has the meaning given such term under section 528 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 528); and
?(4) the term ?member??
?(A) as used with respect to a condominium association, means an owner of a condominium unit (as defined under section 604 ofPublic Law 96?399 (15 U.S.C. 3603)) within such association;
?(B) as used with respect to a cooperative association, means a cooperative unit owner (as defined under section 604 ofPublic Law 96?399 (15 U.S.C. 3603)) within such association; and
?(C) as used with respect to a residential real estate management association, means an owner of a residential property within a subdivision, development, or similar area subject to any policy or restriction adopted by such association.
?SEC. 3. RIGHT TO DISPLAY THE FLAG OF THE UNITED STATES.
?A condominium association, cooperative association, or residential real estate management association may not adopt or enforce any policy, or enter into any agreement, that would restrict or prevent a member of the association from displaying the flag of the United States on residential property within the association with respect to which such member has a separate ownership interest or a right to exclusive possession or use.
?SEC. 4. LIMITATIONS.
?Nothing in this Act shall be considered to permit any display or use that is inconsistent with?
?(1) any provision of chapter 1 of title 4, United States Code, or any rule or custom pertaining to the proper display or use of the flag of the United States (as established pursuant to such chapter or any otherwise applicable provision of law); or
?(2) any reasonable restriction pertaining to the time, place, or manner of displaying the flag of the United States necessary to protect a substantial interest of the condominium association, cooperative association, or residential real estate management association.?

 


Military  Acronyms:  

Accompany = Be With

Accompaniment = Go with the family 

AL = American Legion

ALR = American Legion (motorcycle) Riders 

 

C 

Casings = Shell left over after firing a bullet 

CIV = Civilian 

Coach = Hearse 

CV = Combat Veterans

CVR = Combat Veterans (motorcycle) Club 

 

I 

Invited = Invited to attend the services 

 

K 

KIA = Killed In Action 

M 

MIA = Missing In Action

 

P 

POW = Prisoner Of War

 

S 

Standard = Military Flag or Ribbon

 

P

PGR = Patriot Guard Riders

V 

VFW = Veterans of Foregin Wars

VFWR = Veterans of Foregin Wars (motorcycle) riders

 

 

Another source of information is:

 

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/jointservices/a/twentyonegun.htm


When Johnnie Comes Marching H
Brian Corbett
-3:30